Tuesday

September 25, 2018

It has been many years since we have had to flood irrigate to get our lucerne established
but dry times call for drastic measures. 
We are lucky to have this as an option, albeit a very expensive option this year. 

This photo is a good demonstration how our flood irrigation works. 
The paddock is divided into bays. Each bay is level across its width but has a slight fall down the length and has check-banks down each side to contain the flow of water within each bay. We water one bay at a time. The water comes in the top of the bay via an outlet on a channel and runs down the length, spreading across the full width. Before the water reaches the bottom of the bay we close the outlet to stop the flow of water. Ideally the water should just reach the end, but any that goes out the bottom flows into our on-farm drainage recycle system where it is then pumped back into the channel for re-use.  

Saturday

September 22, 2018

The farmer has to be an optimist or he wouldn’t still be a farmer. ~ Will Rogers

Friday

September 21, 2018

Across the district drought stressed and frost damaged canola crops that would normally be harvested for oil are being cut for hay or silage.

Wednesday

Saturday

September 15, 2018

Blog post #2,000 

With a couple of hiccups along the way we have finally reached 2,000 posts… 2,000 days.  
And I say we because I couldn’t have made it without your continued interest. 

Thank you for being part of the journey. Your encouragement & friendship truly means a lot to me.

I can’t say this photo-a-day commitment has always been easy… this year has been particularly challenging. And I’m not going to make any promises as to where to from here except that I will be back tomorrow… and probably the day after that… and the day after that…

Thursday

Tuesday

September 4, 2018

Water vs no water
The difference between an Autumn watering on the clover and none is stark.